FENWAY PARK SEATS,  repainted and original as-is condition, hundreds.

 

 Above you see 10 seats that are representative of a much larger batch of seats, we will try to update this page with more of the actual seats available and as we make time to repaint them on an ongoing basis.  We are naming the seats that we repaint after our friend Dave Mellor, the grounds-keeper at Fenway Park. Here is some info on Dave who we met in 2007 during our first year of working on the seats at Fenway Park. https://www.davidrmellor.com/about

He has written several books on a variety of topics including his most recent on PTSD : https://www.amazon.com/One-Base-Time-Survived-Dreams/dp/1642932523

Additional info on the “original condition  as-is” seats before they get set aside for the repaint process:
All these seats have been stored indoor since removal in 2010 and are in the exact condition they were when removed after the last game in the 2010 season. This includes seats with dry-rotted boards, mismatching replacement boards, worn seat numbers and severe wear on the wood and paint.

What we do is look at each seat and evaluate whether we feel it is acceptable to be sold as-is or requires some board replacements or painting.

We have hundreds of spare boards to use as replacements, generated from the connecting seats removed from this batch of seats. We also have spare cast iron legs in case a leg has a crack in it.

When customers do come to our shops and see these seats they tend to  agree that most seats need to be repainted to look presentable in a home or office. We try to leave the original number without painting over it, if possible. Sometimes the number has been rubbed off over the years, we have the exact stencils used at Fenway Park for the numbers and we repaint over the old number.

These repainted seats are then carefully placed in plastic bags and stored for sale, and we call them our “Dave Mellor Specials”! 

Some of the repainted seats have higher prices due to scarcity of certain seat numbers and row end seats, the amount of time involved in refurbishing them, which often involves disassembly, looking for new boards that match in style (there were two styles of wooden seats in these sections at Fenway), in width (three widths),  re-assembly and making sure the hinges are not worn too much, rethreading the old bolts and nuts and multiple coats of authentic paint.